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Michael Haneke Quotes and its meanings

Michael Haneke has written on many topics. Some of the topics he has discussed most are as follows;

Age Attitude Death Experience Freedom Funny History Imagination Movies Patience Relationship Romantic Society Trust War

Michael Haneke Quotes Index

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What does Michael Haneke write about?

Michael Haneke has written on many topics but he is most famous for his work about age, attitude, death, experience, freedom, funny, history, imagination, movies, patience, relationship, romantic, society, trust & war. People always share Age quotes, Attitude quotes, death, experience, freedom, funny, history, imagination, movies & patience from his literary works.

What are the top most famous quotes by Michael Haneke?

Here are the top most famous quotes by Michael Haneke.

  • To be perfectly honest, I think that as I'm growing older, I'm just growing more impatient. I'll be very happy if at some point people say, 'Michael's grown wiser and softer in his old age.' But we'll have to wait and see what my next project is.
  • Films for TV have to be much closer to the book, mainly because the objective with a TV movie that translates literature is to get the audience, after seeing this version, to pick up the book and read it themselves. My attitude is that TV can never really be any form of art, because it serves audience expectations.
  • Of course, we avoid death. To know something is inevitable is one thing. To accept, to truly feel it... that's different.
  • Films that are entertainments give simple answers but I think that's ultimately more cynical, as it denies the viewer room to think. If there are more answers at the end, then surely it is a richer experience.
  • You can use your means in a good and bad way. In German-speaking art, we had such a bad experience with the Third Reich, when stories and images were used to tell lies. After the war, literature was careful not to do the same, which is why writers began to reflect on the stories they told and to make readers part of their texts. I do the same.
  • I've never let producers tell me what to do. Even when I was making television, I always did what I wanted to do, and if I couldn't, I didn't do it. It was a freedom that, these days, young directors starting out don't have.
  • It's unbearable when someone changes around you. Just imagine that your life partner changes, then it is difficult to cope with. Or your mother. Or your father. They were strong and now they're like a baby - it's not so funny.
  • 'Funny Games' was conceived as a provocation. My other films are different. If people feel my other films are, or respond to them as provocation, then that's quite different. 'Funny Games' is the only one of mine where my intention was to provoke the audience.
  • When I first envisioned 'Funny Games' in the mid-1990s, it was my intention to have an American audience watch the movie. It is a reaction to a certain American cinema, its violence, its naivety, the way American cinema toys with human beings. In many American films, violence is made consumable.
  • Film is the manipulative medium par excellence. When you think back on the history of film and the 20th century, you see the propaganda that's been made. So there are moral demands on the director to treat the spectators as seriously as he or she takes himself and not to see them merely as victims that can be manipulated to whatever ends they have.
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