David Mamet Peace Quotes

View some of the most famous Peace quotes by David Mamet; Click on the quote page to view more details about the quote.

David Mamet quotes on other topics

David Mamet has written about various topics extensively and has many famous quotes about;

Age Business Computers Death Experience Family Fear Government Happiness Morning Movies Politics Religion Society Truth

Peace quotes by other authors

We have hundreds of other famous Peace quotes by various authors. A list of those authors is as follows;

A. J. Muste A. J. P. Taylor Abba Eban Abdallah II Abraham Kuyper Abraham Lincoln Abraham Maslow Adam Smith Adlai E.Stevenson View all

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What did David Mamet say about Peace?

David Mamet has written many quotes about Peace. E.g.,

  • Policemen so cherish their status as keepers of the peace and protectors of the public that they have occasionally been known to beat to death those citizens or groups who question that status.
  • My idea of perfect happiness is a healthy family, peace between nations, and all the critics die.
  • The Founders recognized that Government is quite literally a necessary evil, that there must be opposition, between its various branches, and between political parties, for these are the only ways to temper the individual's greed for power and the electorates' desires for peace by submission to coercion or blandishment.

What are the top most famous Peace quotes by David Mamet?

Here are the top most famous quotes about Peace by David Mamet.

  • Policemen so cherish their status as keepers of the peace and protectors of the public that they have occasionally been known to beat to death those citizens or groups who question that status.
  • My idea of perfect happiness is a healthy family, peace between nations, and all the critics die.
  • The Founders recognized that Government is quite literally a necessary evil, that there must be opposition, between its various branches, and between political parties, for these are the only ways to temper the individual's greed for power and the electorates' desires for peace by submission to coercion or blandishment.
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